Software Specification is a Process Not a Document (2 of 2)

Engineering depends on the business team to create actionable specifications early enough before a release, to control the scope to a level commensurate to resources and time available, and to use artifacts that are relevant to the information to be conveyed.

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Timing is Everything

Product Management delivering complete specifications in a timely fashion greatly improves the productivity of the Engineering team (Complete being relative the type of specifications – as we discussed in the previous blog). The more precise the information provided at the start of each phase (scoping, release or iteration), the more efficient and accurate will the resulting development work be.

This sounds boringly obvious, but I have seen the contrary scenario over and over again, where business leaders grumble that the Engineering team is not productive, while failing to provide more than a PowerPoint level specification at the start of  releases. As a consequence, developers spend the first third to half of the release working with the Product Managers to define the specs, instead of writing code – or even worse, developers start writing code without spec, and then having to do it over once the specs have been thought through.

Scoping is a 2-way Commitment

Another pitfall to avoid is “scope-creep”. While the name itself would imply that it should be avoided at all costs (who wants to be creepy?), scope creep is an all-too-common occurrence

Scope creep, on the surface, appears to stem from good intentions (we want to meet every customer request – even last minute ones), yet it is one of the most demoralizing behaviors for the Engineering team – akin to continuously pushing back the finish line, after the start of a race.

In order to avoid scope creep, we (Engineering) need to remind the business team that based on the information provided during the scoping phase, Engineering reserved a set of resources for the duration of the release, and committed to deliver the feature set in the allotted time. This in turn creates an implicit contract that the scope of the release – will be bound by the amount of resources allocated to the release. While changes are expected as we get closer to the release start, and even once the release has started, the business team can’t forget that there are only 24 hours in a day, and that no matter how cool it would be to add another 25% functionality, asking the Engineering team for such an increase in scope flies in the face of the process: If we could really do 25% more, we’d have said so the first time during the scoping phase.

In summary, once Engineering  allocates resources for a release and commits to deliverables and schedules, the business team, in turn, must commit to keep the scope of the release commensurate to the resources allocated.

Use the Right Artifacts for the Job

As we replaced Waterfall development process with Agile Software development, we also replaced Market/Product Requirement Documents with User Stories. I have to admit that I don’t get that part, or rather that I find that sometimes user stories are the best vehicle to express customer requirements, and other times, straight requirements do a better job.

For example, when a workflow needs to be implemented, nothing beats a flow chart or a state diagram to define it – we can dispense with the user story on the 3×5 card.

Write Things Down

There is no dispute that face to face discussions are the fastest way to nail down a user story. Often the expected behavior is self-evident from the software implementation itself. However, we must remember that multiple constituencies need to reach common understanding on the software’s behavior: not only the Product Champion and developers, but also, QA, support, services, etc.

Again, there is no way that more than 2 people can reach the same understanding of how a workflow should perform, or what a report is meant to compute unless it is written down, preferably in pictorial form

Technical Risk Must Be Eliminated Prior to Scoping

The business team expects estimates that are fairly accurate – say within 10%. You can see eyes roll when you present  your estimates and then add that the estimate is accurate within 30% … and it’s a fair reaction. As a consequence, time must be invested in research, design and/or prototyping, in order to reach the desired level of accuracy. Sometimes, we need to invest the time to build a prototype in order to validate a design or an architecture. While this initially may appear to be a prohibitive price to pay, a much much higher price would be paid if one embarks on a release, only to miss the deadline by a month or more, because we found out that the original design was inadequate.

Managing Perceptions

Which scenario is best?:

(A)  Promise to deliver 12 features and end up delivering 10 – OR –

(B)  Promise to deliver 9 features and end up delivering 9

In my experience, Scenario (A) is a perceived failure, while (B) will be perceived as a success.

If you agree with me, then you will want to think hard about your iteration plan, and about what features you implement in which iteration. Naturally, the later the iteration within the release, the more likely it is that its features will not be implemented (either because of schedule slips, or changes in priorities). Consequently, plan low-impact features for the last release(s); this way you’ll have to option of jettisoning them if necessary while still nailing the committed schedule. Conversely, if you high-impact features for the end, your only choices will be to disappoint — by taking them out in order to meet the schedule, or to disappoint — by forcing a schedule slip.

In conclusion, software development is a team activity – not only within the Engineering team but also with the business team: Engineering depends on the business team to create actionable specifications early enough before a release, to control the scope to a level commensurate to resources and time available, and to use artifacts that are relevant to the information to be conveyed.

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